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Exhibitions | 07-11-2009

Permanent and Temporary Exhibitions

BUY SEPAZON NO PRESCRIPTION, The Peace Museum’s unique exhibitions explore peace history as well as contemporary issues, local heritage, peacemakers stories and the ways in which people have worked to make the world a better place to live.

See the unique artefacts and exhibitions on display, SEPAZON class, SEPAZON cost, by visiting our small, but attractive Museum galleries. Currently our exhibitions chronicle Bradford's peace heritage in the Bradford Room - 'Peace Not Prejudice'; pacifists and peace organisations in the 'Remembering Forward'gallery space and Conscientious Objectors, about SEPAZON. SEPAZON photos,

Other exhibits look at Campaigning; then and now.  Uncommon Women, SEPAZON australia, uk, us, usa, SEPAZON description, chronicles the women's peace movement  and panels from 'Playing for Peace' mark London 2012 in the Museum's temporary exhibition space. By popular demand the mini- exhibition 'What Story Will You Tell?' the story of Sadako Sasaki (of paper cranes fame!) is also on display, SEPAZON mg. A particular favourite with children visiting the Museum, BUY SEPAZON NO PRESCRIPTION. Buy SEPAZON from canada,

 

Key artefacts and artwork in the Museum have QR codes, This means visitors may use a smart phone or one of our hand held devices to access more information and may leave an immediate response to the collection item or exhibition on one of our blogs, SEPAZON street price. SEPAZON interactions, Please ask for a quiz sheet to have a go at completing as you view the exhibits (there are two) and if you have time please fill in our on line Museum response form (takes about three minutes), ask for a hand held device at the reception desk, buy SEPAZON without prescription. SEPAZON recreational,

 

In Leeds. Why not visit our exhibition at the Royal Armouries?


'A Farewell to Arms?' 


This exhibition was created in conjunction with the Royal Armouries and is on permanent display in the War Gallery on the second floor.  It focuses on the idea of conversion – from war to peace, from weapons and armour to useful tools or symbolic images. Order SEPAZON from United States pharmacy, The display explores the positive changes that have been – and are still being – made by individuals, groups and whole nations that choose to replace conflict with peace, buy SEPAZON online cod. Cheap SEPAZON,

Travelling Exhibitions


In the past the Museum has specialised in travelling exhibitions. We are now scaling down this aspect of our outreach work, purchase SEPAZON for sale, SEPAZON pictures, but we still have a number of exhibitions (some of which were produced quite some time ago) which are available for loan. Please note these are more suitable for adult groups, purchase SEPAZON online no prescription, Comprar en línea SEPAZON, comprar SEPAZON baratos, than children (unless otherwise stated) because of the language used on the panels. There is a £10.00 handling fee when an exhibition is loaned, SEPAZON alternatives, SEPAZON dose, plus the cost of postage and packaging.

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Vacancy: The Peace Museum Community Covenant Choices Project: Project Manager

Vacancy: The Peace Museum Community Covenant Choices Project: Project Manager

Exhibitions | 02-04-2015

The Peace Museum has received a grant of £53,000 from the Armed Forces Community Covenant to develop and deliver the Choices programme which is aimed at both school children and communities, and relates their experiences and choices to those of young people involved in the First World War. Please download the following pdf to find out more: Project Manager Vacancy Should you wish to purchase a copy of the Choices Then and Now resource contact info@peacemuseum.org.uk. More information can be found at www.choicesthenandnow.co.uk.

Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) and Women’s rights

Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) and Women’s rights

Collection | 19-03-2015

Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) and Women’s rights The time of the year is nearly approaching to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the WILPF.  In April 1915 a congregation of women from a range of backgrounds and cultures gathered together in an International Congress in The Hague as a reaction to the end of the First World War and to protest against war in the future.  This was when the WILPF was founded in 1915 and it is still ongoing. Women raised issues such as equality, rights for women, justice and freedom. These are what the WILPF have set their aims on in order to free women to work in peace and to participate in decision making.  Many programmes are being undertaken such as ‘The Human Rights Programme’ and ‘The Gender, Peace and Security Programme’ to fulfil their mission. As well as this you can get yourself involved by sponsoring, donating or by being a member. For more information you can click on the link below: http://www.wilpfinternational.org/get-involved/ Women’s rights are about women having the same rights as men. Feminists have fought for many rights which have made women’s lives much easier in today’s society.  Votes for women, being part of the election, owning a property, equal pay to men’s, being able to work  and be involved in the decision making process were all fought for. This has created independence ensuring women no longer have to rely on their husbands for money and other social aspects. Times have changed in much of the world and huge reforms have been made for women in today’s society, even though there are still many stereotypes that exist. Women are now able to work outside of the home with the rights to a wage, as well as achieving full time education. However, this is unfortunately still not the case for women in some countries; therefore the WILPF and other women’s organisations remain important. We have a range of items in our collection which specify women as peacemakers

The ‘Greenham Common 25 years on’

This booklet was produced on September 6th October 2006 to attend an exhibition held at Newsroom, the Guardian and Observer Archive. A group of Welsh women known as ‘Women for Life on Earth’ arrived at the Greenham Common Women’s Peace Camp in Berkshire on September 5th 1981. They marched to Cardiff with the intention to debate about the location of the 96 Cruise missiles there. When they arrived they conveyed a letter to the Base Commander which was one of the things stated ‘We fear for the future of all our children and for the future of living world which is the basis of all life’.
 A guide to Freedom, Peace and Friendship

A guide to Freedom, Peace and Friendship

This pack consists of eleven bookmarks with an illustration and text in Japanese and English and a coloured ribbon attached. It was published by Grassroots House in Kochi, Japan. The museum highlights article 9 of the Japanese constitution which renounces war ‘Lets grow trees of peace’. In the mid-19th century, young people from Kochi have been visiting to Europe to learn about new thinking which is why the area has always been orientated. From the above statement (image) you can see that women really wanted peace as well as gaining justice and equality. Women have often felt invisible and have been treated like a robot.  They have often been excluded from the political, social and economic aspects of society.  
Badges

Badges

These badges symbolise peace. The badges consist of two Campaigns for Nuclear Disarmament (CND) which is a well-known symbol indicating peace and in Britain it stands for nuclear disarmament. There are two badges with a symbol of CND which states ‘Pensioners for peace’. One of the badges highlights ‘Give Peace a Chance’ which again has a symbol of CND. The wooden white dove represents peace, appreciating simple things in life as well as signifying qualities of home, security and maternal characters. Aiding to find inner peace by meditation and by deep breathing. The ‘Green Peace’ badge of a white dove carrying an olive branch specifies the rainforest being demolished. The olive branches are being used for palm oil which is destroying the forest. The green badge, an illustration of a dove with a pound sign which states ‘Peace Tax Campaign’. This badge clearly shows that taxes were being paid for the war. It aims legal rights to conscientious objection to taxes and for it to be spent on peacebuilding rather than spending it in the war. Badges have been a long been used to highlight different campaigns. We have many badges on display in the museum that relate to women’s rights and other important issues. For more information pay a visit to the museum to see our collection. Seerat Mahmood. Seerat is a current student at Bradford College studying BA (Hons) Education Studies. She recently completed a three week work placement at the Museum.    

Peace History is Herstory Too: An Exhibition Celebrating Women’s Peace History.

Peace History is Herstory Too: An Exhibition Celebrating Women’s Peace History.

Collection | 03-03-2015

A new exhibition opening at the Museum!

Peace History is Herstory Too: An Exhibition Celebrating Women's Peace History.

WILPF, Zurich, 1919

WILPF, Zurich, 1919

To celebrate International Women’s Day on March 8th, and the Centenary of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom in April, the Peace Museum is proud to present an exhibition exploring the efforts of women and women’s groups throughout history to campaign for peace and equality.The exhibition will run from March through until May and features an extension of our permanent Greenham Common exhibition: Common Ground, Uncommon Women. It also explores the history of the WILPF, the Cooperative Women’s Guild and includes banners and objects from various local, national and international women’s peace groups. The exhibition highlights how women’s groups have been at the forefront of campaigns, such as the extension of women’s rights, campaigns for equality and have been at the forefront of vocal and active opposition against nuclear weaponry. The Museum would welcome group visits to the view the exhibition, particularly those celebrating IWD and the centenary of the WILPF. The Museum is open every Thursday 10am till 4pm, and at other times by prior arrangement. To book a visit, contact shannen.lang@peacemuseum.org.uk. Please download the leaflet; feel free to display/distribute accordingly Peace History is Herstory Too PosterLeaflet.

Travelling Exhibitions

Travelling Exhibitions

Collection | 19-02-2015

Travelling Exhibitions

The Peace Museum has five travelling exhibitions that are available for loan by an organisation/individual for the purposes of a short-term display. They cover various themes and topics and come in a range of different sizes. We do not charge for this service; however the borrower must cover postage and packaging costs. In addition, as the Museum is a charity, a donation which would cover staff time in arranging the loan would be most welcomed. To discuss the loaning of our travelling exhibitions, please contact The Peace Museum Team by email at info@peacemuseum.org.uk. For further information regarding the travelling exhibitions we have, please download our leaflet: Travelling Exhibitions Leaflet 2015.

Object of the fortnight- 23/10/2014- The Unitarian Flaming Chalice

Object of the fortnight- 23/10/2014- The Unitarian Flaming Chalice

Collection | 23-10-2014

Object of the fortnight- 23/10/2014- The Unitarian Flaming Chalice This week’s blog focuses on a new object we have just kindly received, a Unitarian Flaming Chalice and will tell the story behind it. It has being put on display in the Bradford Room, so please come to visit the museum to see it! Who are the Unitarians? Unitarians have their roots in Christianity and are now known to have an open minded and welcoming approach to faith that encourages individual freedom and equality for all. They believe everyone has the right to reach their own conclusions. A little bit of history The Unitarian movement can be traced back to the 16th century in Poland and Transylvania. However, in Britain, it was originally seen as heresy and several early radical reformers that supported the Unitarian cause in the 16th and 17th centuries suffered imprisonment and martyrdom for their beliefs. The first Unitarian church in the UK was opened in London in 1774 and there are now more than two hundred congregations throughout the country. Some prominent Unitarians include Joseph Priestley, Elizabeth Gaskell, Charles Dickens and Thomas Jefferson. The Story behind the Chalice The Chalice started out by representing the religious courage of Jan Hus, a Czech Priest during the fifteenth century.  He offered communion to his congregants going against the Roman Church, who felt the sharing of the wine should be between priests only. He was burnt at the stake for this act. During the Second World War Reverend Charles Joy, an American Unitarian was stationed in Lisbon to help with the refugees who came there. He commissioned a Czech refugee, Hans Deutsch, to design something that could be used on official documents. Hans first brought together the chalice and the flame as a Unitarian symbol.  This saw the emergence of the modern chalice. For more information on the Chalice an information sheet can be found with the chalice. With thanks to James Timiney for his kind donation of the object and the useful information sheet he provided to be shared with visitors.

By Charlotte Hall

Charlotte joined The Peace Museum in May 2014 as a collections intern and is now working as a museum assistant. Charlotte has been leading a location audit of the collections and has helped install and research objects in the newly developed WW1 gallery. Charlotte is studying a Masters in Museum and Art Gallery Studies at the University of Manchester.

 

Object of the Fortnight-09/10/2014- GREENHAM COMMON WOMEN’S PEACE CAMP COLLAGES

Object of the Fortnight-09/10/2014- GREENHAM COMMON WOMEN’S PEACE CAMP COLLAGES

Collection | 03-10-2014

Object of the Fortnight-09/10/2014- Greenham Common Women’s Peace Camp Collages   IMGP2751   IMGP2747 This week blog looks at the Greenham Common Women’s Peace Camp. There are many items in the museum’s collection which cover this event.  However, today’s blog will discuss the beautiful collection of collages depicting the Greenham Common Women’s Peace Camp.  History of the Peace Camp The peace camp was established to protest the nuclear weapons at RAF Greenham Common in Berkshire. It was established in September 1981 after a Welsh group called ‘Women for Life on Earth’, went to Greenham to protest against the decision of the British government to allow cruise missiles to be based there. One of the most famous events for the camp occurred in April 1983. Almost 70,000 protesters formed a 14 mile human chain from Greenham to Aldermaston. Then in December 1983 around 50,000 women encircled the base. This led to sections of the fence being cut and hundreds were arrested. The museum has a display in the main gallery which explains the story of Greenham Common, including a piece of the original fence. The Camp only closed in 2000 to make way for the Commemorative and Historic Site on the land that housed the original Women’s Peace Camp at Yellow Gate Greenham Common between the years 1981 – 2000. The Collages The museum has a collection of collages representing the events of Greenham Common. Each one of them features a different time during the Peace Camp and were created by Daphne Morgan. Three of these colourful collages are currently on display in the museums main gallery along with other items relating to the peace camp so come visit the museum to view them! The first one shows the peace camp in October 1981, a month after it was established. In the collage you can see that many tents and signs have already being put up by the women. (See image) The second one then moves on to September 1982 and shows protestors being evicted by the police. (See image) Finally the third one shows a snowy scene from December 1983, three years into the peace camp and shows a group of women sat around a camp fire. (See image)

By Charlotte Hall

Charlotte joined The Peace Museum in May 2014 as a collections intern and is now working as a museum assistant. Charlotte has been leading a location audit of the collections and has helped install and research objects in the newly developed WW1 gallery. Charlotte is studying a Masters in Museum and Art Gallery Studies at the University of Manchester.

 

OBJECT OF THE FORTNIGHT- 27/08/2014 ‘VEGETARIANS AGAINST THE BOMB’

OBJECT OF THE FORTNIGHT- 27/08/2014 ‘VEGETARIANS AGAINST THE BOMB’

Collection | 27-08-2014

OBJECT OF THE FORTNIGHT- 27/08/2014 CND BANNER   VEGETARIANS AGAINST BOMBS As the month of August comes to an end, the object of the fortnight has being chosen in remembrance of the 1945 Atomic bomb attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. In the museum collection there are many different items relating around the anti-nuclear theme. This blog will give examples of some of the main ones. A Bit of History The United States used the bombs against Japan during the final stages of World War Two. The first bomb was dropped on Hiroshima on August 6th 1945 and just a few days later, Nagasaki was bombed. This was the first and only time atomic bombs have been used in warfare. On August 14th Japan surrendered to the allies and signed the ‘instrument of surrender’ ending World War Two. The effects Around 30% of Nagasaki, including almost all the industrial district was destroyed by the bomb and nearly 74,000 were killed and a similar number injured. In Hiroshima, more than 60% of the buildings were destroyed. Japanese figures at the time put the death toll at 118,661. However, later on estimates suggest that the final toll was around 140,000 of Hiroshima's 350,000 population. This also included military personnel and those who died later from radiation. The effects of the atomic bombs are still being dealt with today as residents from both cities are still suffering the physical and mental consequences of radiation. A previous blog ‘Refurbished Temporary Exhibition Area & Object of the Fortnight 11/06/2014’ covers one of the more unique pieces in the collection - a piece of a roof tile from a building in Nagasaki. If you wish to view this it is currently on display in the temporary exhibition area of the museum and the blog is still available to read on our website. The Anti-Nuclear movement The Anti- Nuclear cause has been taken on by many different groups. One of the main ones is Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, (CND). Their symbol has become almost universally acknowledged as the main symbol for peace. The ‘CND campaigns non-violently to achieve British nuclear disarmament – for scrapping the Trident nuclear weapons system and preventing its replacement.’ The museum collections includes a  variety of CND related items. The Objects: -A variety of badges all with an anti-nuclear theme- one of my favourites being ‘Vegetarians Against the Bomb.’(Image above) -CND related items, including posters, banners and leaflets. One such banner currently on display in the museum has a quote from Lord Home 1961 which states, ‘The British people are prepared to be blown to atomic dust if Necessary’ (Image above) - Also we have on display the story of Sadako Sasaki a girl who felt the effects of the bombs later on in her life. These are only a small amount of anti-nuclear items that are a part of our collection. Come down to museum today to see more of them! By Charlotte Hall

Charlotte joined The Peace Museum in May 2014 as a collections intern. Charlotte has been leading a location audit of the collections and has helped install and research objects in the newly developed WW1 gallery. Charlotte is studying a Masters in Museum and Art Gallery Studies at the University of Manchester.

‘Disobedient Objects’ at The V&A (26 July 2014 – 1 February 2015)

‘Disobedient Objects’ at The V&A (26 July 2014 – 1 February 2015)

Collection | 01-08-2014

The Peace Museum is very proud to have loaned The V&A  one of its fantastic banners for its exhibition 'Disobedient Objects'. The exhibition, which was launched on 26th of July, runs until the 1st of February 2015. "From a Suffragette tea service to protest robots, this exhibition will be the first to examine the powerful role of objects in movements for social change. It will demonstrate how political activism drives a wealth of design ingenuity and collective creativity that defy standard definitions of art and design. Disobedient Objects will focus on the period from the late 1970s to now, a time that has brought new technologies and political challenges. On display will be arts of rebellion from around the world that illuminate the role of making in grassroots movements for social change: finely woven banners; defaced currency; changing designs for barricades and blockades; political video games; an inflatable general assembly to facilitate consensus decision-making; experimental activist-bicycles; and textiles bearing witness to political murders." http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/exhibitions/disobedient-objects/disobedient-objects-about-the-exhibition/ The banner on loan to The V&A is a 'Greenham Common Women's Peace Group' banner made by Thalia Campbell. This banner is very apt for this exhibition as Martin Roth, Director of the V&A explains: "This exhibition celebrates the creative 'disobedience' of designers and makers who question the rules. It shows that even with the most limited of resources, ordinary people can take design into their own hands. This is a brae and unusual exhibitions; these are brave and unusual designers. We are proud to present their work".

Banner made by Thalia Campbell.

Banner made by Thalia Campbell.

The exhibition is FREE and takes places in the Porter Gallery of The V&A. The V&A is open daily from 10.00 until 17.45 (22.00 on Fridays). The exhibition will tour after the exhibition at The V&A. Watch this space for details of temporary venues. The exhibition is supported by Cockayne – Grants for the Arts, a donor-advised fund of The London Community Foundation. Visit http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/exhibitions/disobedient-objects/ for more information about the exhibition. Thanks to The V&A's exhibition, curatorial and press teams for support.

Object of the fortnight 30/07/2014- From War to Peace: Or a story of some very stupid people who came to their senses

Object of the fortnight 30/07/2014- From War to Peace: Or a story of some very stupid people who came to their senses

Collection | 30-07-2014

FROM WAR TO PEACE: OR A STORY OF SOME VERY STUPID PEOPLE WHO CAME TO THEIR SENSES  

FRONT COVER

THE FRONT COVER

PEACE PLEDGE UNION POSTCARD

PEACE PLEDGE UNION POSTCARD

  The object of the fortnight is a booklet with the amusing title ‘From war to peace: or a story of some very stupid people who came to their senses.’ To coincide with Yorkshire day, on the first of August, we have chosen a booklet which incorporates Yorkshire but not as you would think! It is associated with the Peace Pledge Union who are the possible publishers. The booklet is currently on display in the WW1 gallery at the museum. The Peace Pledge Union The Peace Pledge Union is the oldest secular pacifist organisation in Britain. Since 1934 it has been campaigning for a warless world. They are still active today and have projects such as the White Poppy campaign. What’s the story about? The booklet is essentially about the escalation of war between the English counties, especially between Yorkshire and Lancashire. But they are not referring to the War of the Roses here, they are talking about the First World War and using England as a metaphor for the world. Who’s who? Yorkshire- Germany Lancashire- France London- England Sussex- Austria- Hungry Wales- the United States Northumberland- Russia Norfolk- Japan Kent- Italy The County Council- The League of Nations The Story It mentions all the key events that led up to the First World War and what happened throughout. An extract from the booklet states, ‘In the last year of the war Wales suddenly came in on the part of Lancashire, and the Welsh used to annoy all the other counties of England for years afterward by saying, “ Indeed, and it was all down to us who the war.” ’ It then talks about the failures of the County Council leading up to the Second World War. However this is where it diverges from history because in this story the Second World War never happened. Instead London showed the rest of the counties how to become peaceful by asking its people what they wanted and asked them to send in the postcard (picture above.) It was agreed by undertaking full disarmament others would in turn follow suit and the arms race that had plagued the Counties of England and led them to war in 1914 would be averted. It ends with, ‘Yorkshire and Lancashire were the last to disarm, but they did in the end, and England was at peace. And in those days England was the whole world’   By Charlotte Hall. Charlotte joined The Peace Museum in May 2014 as a collection intern. Charlotte has been leading a location audit of the collections and has helped install and research objects in the newly developed WW1 gallery. Charlotte is studying a Masters in Museum and Art Gallery Studies at the University of Manchester.

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