BUY SEPAZON NO PRESCRIPTION

BUY SEPAZON NO PRESCRIPTION

Exhibitions | 07-11-2009

Permanent and Temporary Exhibitions

BUY SEPAZON NO PRESCRIPTION, The Peace Museum’s unique exhibitions explore peace history as well as contemporary issues, local heritage, peacemakers stories and the ways in which people have worked to make the world a better place to live.

See the unique artefacts and exhibitions on display, SEPAZON class, SEPAZON cost, by visiting our small, but attractive Museum galleries, about SEPAZON. SEPAZON photos, Our current exhibits encompass local, national and international peace history, SEPAZON australia, uk, us, usa. SEPAZON description, Our 'Bradford Room' chronicles Bradford's long affinity with peace, peacemaking and peacemakers, SEPAZON mg, Buy SEPAZON from canada, such as the famous Hockneys and social campaigners Margaret MacMillan and William Forster. We have a room dedicated to the First World War, SEPAZON street price, SEPAZON interactions, telling the stories of those who opposed the war, including conscientious objectors such as the 'Richmond 16', buy SEPAZON without prescription. The room links to our 'Choices Then and Now' resource and project which will soon form an offsite exhibition, BUY SEPAZON NO PRESCRIPTION. SEPAZON recreational, Watch this space for further updates.

Other exhibits look at Campaigning; then and now, buying SEPAZON online over the counter. Order SEPAZON from United States pharmacy,  Our Greenham Common: Common Ground, Uncommon women exhibit details the tireless campaigning of the Greenham women, buy SEPAZON online cod. Cheap SEPAZON, Our temporary exhibition space is currently a history of women's peace campaigning and has been extended by popular demand.   We also have the mini- exhibition 'What Story Will You Tell?' the story of Sadako Sasaki (of paper cranes fame!). BUY SEPAZON NO PRESCRIPTION, A particular favourite with children visiting the Museum.

More information can be found under the 'Exhibitions' and 'Collections' tab, purchase SEPAZON for sale. SEPAZON pictures,

 

 

 

 

In Leeds. Why not visit our exhibition at the Royal Armouries?


'A Farewell to Arms?' 


This exhibition was created in conjunction with the Royal Armouries and is on permanent display in the War Gallery on the second floor.  It focuses on the idea of conversion – from war to peace, SEPAZON alternatives, SEPAZON dose, from weapons and armour to useful tools or symbolic images.

The display explores the positive changes that have been – and are still being – made by individuals, purchase SEPAZON, Order SEPAZON online overnight delivery no prescription, groups and whole nations that choose to replace conflict with peace.

Travelling Exhibitions


The Museum has several travelling exhibitions which can be loaned out and displayed, SEPAZON over the counter. SEPAZON canada, mexico, india, Please click the link for more information.

, SEPAZON schedule. SEPAZON no prescription. Online buying SEPAZON hcl. SEPAZON trusted pharmacy reviews. SEPAZON results. SEPAZON without prescription. Order SEPAZON online c.o.d. SEPAZON price, coupon. Where can i find SEPAZON online. Buy cheap SEPAZON no rx. Order SEPAZON from mexican pharmacy. Australia, uk, us, usa. SEPAZON no rx. SEPAZON price.

Similar posts: TRAMADOL FOR SALE. ZOLPIDEM FOR SALE. PROSCAR FOR SALE. FRUMIL from canadian pharmacy. VALTREX maximum dosage. ZOLPIDEM use.
Trackbacks from: BUY SEPAZON NO PRESCRIPTION. BUY SEPAZON NO PRESCRIPTION. BUY SEPAZON NO PRESCRIPTION. SEPAZON price, coupon. SEPAZON recreational. SEPAZON canada, mexico, india.

New Temporary Exhibition: Maggie Glover: ‘Painter of Honest Portraits’

New Temporary Exhibition: Maggie Glover: ‘Painter of Honest Portraits’

Collection | 20-07-2016

Opening Friday 5th August

Margaret Glover was a contemporary artist and peace activist who through her work, combined her passions of peace and art to create a fascinating socio-historical record of peace activism. Maggie covered various meetings, peace vigils conferences, anti-war protests throughout her life, and these are depicted through her artwork. Following on from a successful exhibition showcasing Maggie's work in 2014, entitled 'Images of Peace', the new exhibition will feature artwork already held in The Peace Museum Collection, but will also include newly acquired objects from Maggie's personal records. This will include a 'behind the scenes' look at her artistic process, through documents and photographs from her archive. Group bookings are welcome to view the exhibition. Please distribute the flyer amongst your networks; Maggie Glover Exhibition Flyer.

Special Evening Event

Thursday 11th August 5.30pm till 7.30pm

To celebrate the opening of the Maggie Glover exhibition, the evening will commence at 5.30pm with a drinks reception, followed by introductions to the exhibition and a viewing. Free entry, all welcome. Please distribute the flyer amongst your networks; Maggie Glover Opening Evening. Please RSVP to shannen.lang@peacemuseum.org.uk   With thanks to the Glover family.

Closing of ‘A force for peace?’ The History of European Cooperation Exhibition

Closing of ‘A force for peace?’ The History of European Cooperation Exhibition

Exhibitions | 14-07-2016

There are only a few opportunities left to visit our 'A force for peace?' The History of European Cooperation Exhibition. The exhibition will close on Friday 22nd July as staff prepare for our upcoming temporary exhibition. The new exhibition will showcase the artwork of Maggie Glover, including newly acquired objects. Thank you to all those who have visited have the exhibition and added their contribution.    

Courage, Conscience and Creativity Exhibition

Courage, Conscience and Creativity Exhibition

Collection | 17-06-2016

Courage, Conscience & Creativity Exhibition

CO-Curated by The Peace Museum!

28 May - 4 Dec 2016, Leeds City Museum

 As part of Leeds City Museum's First World War commemorations, Leeds City Museum have opened a new community display and is co-curated by The Peace Museum, Concord Interfaith Network and Leeds Quakers. The display focuses on the themes of peace, interfaith work and conscientious objectors.
There are two main strands to the display, first is a year and a half long community project led by Concord Interfaith Network called ‘Women Peacing Together’. It involved a group of women from different faiths meeting at different places of worship, community centres and the museum to work together on creating a textile banner themed around peace and interfaith connections. The finished textile banner will be showcased alongside other items and this display also marks Concord’s 40th anniversary since starting up back in 1976. The second involves the Leeds Quakers and the Bradford Peace Museum curating stories and material that will look at conscientious objectors in the First World War and their legacy today. Some highlights will include the Friends Ambulance Unit and Richmond Castle cell graffiti.

Special Event

‘When is it right to fight?’ Thurs 14th July 10:30am – 12:00pm Sun 17th July 2:00pm – 3:30pm (Thoresby Room, Leeds City Museum) Reflective session drawing on historic and current resources with Leeds Quakers. In 1916 Britain was already at war when the introduction of conscription made fighting an unavoidable question.  In 2016 men and women are still conscripted and elected governments have to decide when to take up arms. This session will lead you through the experience of varied past, present and international responses to the question. It will give you time and space to reflect on your own questions and answers and to listen to others. Suitable for anyone interested over the age of 12. Facilitators from Leeds Quakers are Yael Arbel, with personal knowledge of conscription, and Jonathan Fox from the Peace Museum, Bradford.
Visit http://www.leeds.gov.uk/museumsandgalleries/Pages/Peace-Display.aspx to find out more.

Special Blog on the Treaty of Versailles

Special Blog on the Treaty of Versailles

Collection | 21-04-2016

On the 28th June 1919 exactly five years after the assassination of Arch Duke Franz Ferdinand, the Treaty of Versailles was signed in the Hall of Mirrors at the Palace of Versailles near Paris.  This ended the state of war between Germany and the Allied Powers.   Although the Armistice was signed on 11 November 1918, ending the actual fighting, it took six months of negotiations at the Paris Peace Conference to conclude the Peace Treaty. Negotiations between the Allied powers started on 18 January in the Salle de l'Horloge at the French Foreign Ministry on the Quai d'Orsay in Paris.  Initially, 70 delegates from 27 nations participated in the negotiations.  The defeated nations of Germany, Austria, and Hungary were excluded from the negotiations. Russia was also excluded because it had negotiated a separate peace (the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk) with Germany in 1918. At first a "Council of Ten" comprising two delegates each from Britain, France, the United States, Italy and Japan decided the peace terms.  However, it became the "Big Four" when Japan dropped out and the top person from each of the other four nations met in 145 closed sessions to make all the major decisions to be ratified by the entire assembly.  Apart from Italian issues, the main conditions were determined at personal meetings among the leaders of the "Big Three" nations: British Prime Minister David Lloyd George, French Prime Minister Georges Clemenceau, and American President Woodrow Wilson. The minor nations attended a weekly "Plenary Conference" that discussed issues in a general forum, but made no decisions. These members formed over 50 commissions that made various recommendations, many of which were incorporated into the final treaty. On 7 May, the treaty was presented to Germany.  For most of the allies the treaty had created a just peace which weakened Germany, secured the French border against attack and created an organisation to ensure future world peace, to be called the League of Nations. Yet the backlash in Germany against the Treaty was enormous.  She was stripped of 13 per cent of her territory and ten per cent of her population; the border territories of Alsace and Lorraine were returned to France. Germany lost all of her colonies, 75 per cent of her iron ore deposits and 26 per cent of her coal and potash. The size of the army and navy was drastically cut, and an air force and submarines were forbidden. The Germans also had to officially accept ‘war guilt’ and pay reparations of around £6,600 million When faced with the conditions dictated by the victors, including the so-called "War Guilt Clause", von Brockdorff-Rantzau (Foreign Minister for Germany) replied to Clemenceau, Wilson and Lloyd George: "We know the full brunt of hate that confronts us here. You demand from us to confess we were the only guilty party of war; such a confession in my mouth would be a lie." Because Germany was not allowed to take part in the negotiations, the German government issued a protest against what it considered to be unfair demands, and a "violation of honour", soon afterwards withdrawing from the proceedings of the peace conference. Germans of all political shades denounced the treaty—particularly the provision that blamed Germany for starting the war—as an insult to the nation's honour. They referred to the treaty as "the Diktat", dictated peace, since its terms were presented to Germany on a take-it-or-leave-it basis. In June 1919, the Allies declared that war would resume if the German government did not sign the Treaty that they had agreed to among themselves.  The Government headed by Philip Scheidemann  - Germany's first democratically elected head of government, was unable to agree on a common position, and Scheidemann himself resigned rather than agree to sign the treaty.  In a passionate speech before the National Assembly on 21 March 1919, he called the treaty a "murderous plan" and exclaimed, “Which hand, trying to put us in chains like these, would not wither? The treaty is unacceptable.” Gustav Bauer, the head of the new government, sent a telegram stating his intention to sign the treaty if certain articles were withdrawn, including articles 227, 230 and 231.   In response, the Allies issued an ultimatum stating that Germany would have to accept the treaty or face an invasion of Allied forces across the Rhine within 24 hours.  On 23 June, Bauer capitulated and sent a second telegram with a confirmation that a German delegation would arrive shortly to sign the treaty.  Then on 28 June 1919, the peace treaty was signed.  The treaty had clauses ranging from war crimes, the prohibition on the merging of Austria with Germany without the consent of the League of Nations, freedom of navigation on major European rivers, to the returning of a Koran to the King of Hedjan. It is now strongly believed that the harsh treatment of Germany in the forming of the Treaty of Versailles was one of the major causes of the Second World War.   The copy of the Treaty This copy of the Treaty of Versailles was in possession of the Labour Party following the signing of the Treaty of Versailles in 1919 and was given to Meredith Farrar Titterington.  Meredith was born in Bradford and started his working life aged eleven as a mill-boy in a dyeworks.  He went on to study at night school and in 1909 won a scholarship to Ruskin College, Oxford.  On completing his studies he worked for the trade union ‘Amalgamated Society of Stuff and Woollen Warehousemen’ and in 1915 became General Secretary.  During the war period 1914 – 18 he was on the War Council.  He was a member of the Labour Party and was elected to Bradford Council in 1919, becoming an alderman in 1929 and Lord Mayor of Bradford in 1939 – 1940.  He was elected the Member of Parliament for Bradford South in the 1945 General Election, but died in office on 28 October 1949. His funeral service was held at Bradford Cathedral and was taken by the Provost of Bradford, the Very Rev. J. G Tiarks.  In his address the Provost said they were saying goodbye to a life well spent in the public service.  That idea, and the great regard in which he was held, was reflected in the many mourners who included Members of Parliament, the Lord Mayor and Lady Mayoress of Bradford, members and officers of the City Council, his own Labour Party as well as those from across the political spectrum, the Cooperative Movement and Trade Unions and representatives from many areas of the local community in Bradford. The Treaty was later passed on by his daughter to a close friend, Audrey Wilkinson, an art teacher at Wyke Manor School.  She in turn gave it to Martin Bland, a history teacher at Wyke Manor and later Salt Grammar to be used with his history students.  As a result this copy has always been in the hands of Bradford residents and, supporters or members of the Labour Party.  It has now been donated by Martin Bland to the Peace Museum in Bradford as the anniversary of that flawed peace approaches, in the hope that it will be used by visitors and students, and is given in memory of Meredith Farrar Titterington, an advocate of peace. Objects from The Peace Museum collection, Bradford. Exhibition Staff here at the Peace Museum have been working very hard to put together a new exhibition in our temporary exhibition space to replace the previous ‘Basque Children in Yorkshire Exhibit.’  The new exhibit will be entitled ‘A force for peace? The History of European Co-operation,’ and will include our newly acquired copy of The Treaty of Versailles. The exhibition seeks to explore the troubled past of Europe and how European nations have overcome difficulties and difference which led to conflict. The exhibition is set to open in May and run until July of this year.  We will also be putting on a special evening event on Thursday 12th May 5:30pm till 7:30pm.  There will be a drinks reception, followed by an introduction to the exhibition, a viewing, and an informal discussion about European cooperation and the upcoming referendum.  The event will be part of the nationwide Museums at Night event.  If you wish to attend please RSVP to shannen.lang@peacemuseum.org.uk     Written By Sarah Bartey

NEW Exhibition: A force for peace? The History of European Cooperation

NEW Exhibition: A force for peace? The History of European Cooperation

Exhibitions | 16-03-2016

The Peace Museum is pleased to announce a new exhibition opening on Thursday 5th May and running until July 2016. It will feature a newly acquired 1919 copy of the Treaty of Versailles, objects relating to the League of Nations, the UN, and will explore the development of the European Economic Community, which became the European Union. It will also provide information on the upcoming British referendum on Britain's continued membership to the EU and will present arguments from both sides. Group bookings and schools visits are most welcome. Watch this space for further information regarding a special opening evening event! Contact info@peacemuseum.org.uk for more information or to get involved. Download the poster; The History of European Cooperation Poster Feel free to distribute the poster to any who may be interested.

New ‘Responses to Conflict’ Exhibition

New ‘Responses to Conflict’ Exhibition

Exhibitions | 12-11-2015

NEW “Responses to Conflict Exhibition” opening in November

If you have visited the museum in recent weeks or you have been following our updates on social media, you may have already heard about our new exhibition.  It is now open to view, with some additions still to be made, in what was our World War One (WWI) room.  This is due to many of our objects from this exhibition being used for the offsite ‘Choices’ exhibition at the Bradford playhouse, also due to open in November. The theme of our new exhibition is responses to conflict and contains objects from the two World Wars, the Vietnam War, the Cold War, the Iraq War and the war in Afghanistan. Some of our objects include: a traditional wicker basket which is also featured in our October ‘Object of the Month’ blog.  The basket belonged to a lady called Frances Mackeith who bought it upon the announcement of WWII in the United Kingdom. Frances was an active campaigner for more than 50 years and took the basket with her on all her peace campaigns. We also have a collection of satirical cartoons relating to the Cold War, a fragment of the Berlin Wall and a splinter from a dismantled SS23 Soviet missile and many more interesting objects. The museum is open every Thursday from 10:00 to 16:00. Whether you’ve been to the museum before or not, now is a very exciting time to come on down for a visit to us here at the Peace Musuem and explore our exhibits old and new.

Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) and Women’s rights

Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) and Women’s rights

Collection | 19-03-2015

Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) and Women’s rights The time of the year is nearly approaching to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the WILPF.  In April 1915 a congregation of women from a range of backgrounds and cultures gathered together in an International Congress in The Hague as a reaction to the end of the First World War and to protest against war in the future.  This was when the WILPF was founded in 1915 and it is still ongoing. Women raised issues such as equality, rights for women, justice and freedom. These are what the WILPF have set their aims on in order to free women to work in peace and to participate in decision making.  Many programmes are being undertaken such as ‘The Human Rights Programme’ and ‘The Gender, Peace and Security Programme’ to fulfil their mission. As well as this you can get yourself involved by sponsoring, donating or by being a member. For more information you can click on the link below: http://www.wilpfinternational.org/get-involved/ Women’s rights are about women having the same rights as men. Feminists have fought for many rights which have made women’s lives much easier in today’s society.  Votes for women, being part of the election, owning a property, equal pay to men’s, being able to work  and be involved in the decision making process were all fought for. This has created independence ensuring women no longer have to rely on their husbands for money and other social aspects. Times have changed in much of the world and huge reforms have been made for women in today’s society, even though there are still many stereotypes that exist. Women are now able to work outside of the home with the rights to a wage, as well as achieving full time education. However, this is unfortunately still not the case for women in some countries; therefore the WILPF and other women’s organisations remain important. We have a range of items in our collection which specify women as peacemakers

The ‘Greenham Common 25 years on’

This booklet was produced on September 6th October 2006 to attend an exhibition held at Newsroom, the Guardian and Observer Archive. A group of Welsh women known as ‘Women for Life on Earth’ arrived at the Greenham Common Women’s Peace Camp in Berkshire on September 5th 1981. They marched to Cardiff with the intention to debate about the location of the 96 Cruise missiles there. When they arrived they conveyed a letter to the Base Commander which was one of the things stated ‘We fear for the future of all our children and for the future of living world which is the basis of all life’.
 A guide to Freedom, Peace and Friendship

A guide to Freedom, Peace and Friendship

This pack consists of eleven bookmarks with an illustration and text in Japanese and English and a coloured ribbon attached. It was published by Grassroots House in Kochi, Japan. The museum highlights article 9 of the Japanese constitution which renounces war ‘Lets grow trees of peace’. In the mid-19th century, young people from Kochi have been visiting to Europe to learn about new thinking which is why the area has always been orientated. From the above statement (image) you can see that women really wanted peace as well as gaining justice and equality. Women have often felt invisible and have been treated like a robot.  They have often been excluded from the political, social and economic aspects of society.  
Badges

Badges

These badges symbolise peace. The badges consist of two Campaigns for Nuclear Disarmament (CND) which is a well-known symbol indicating peace and in Britain it stands for nuclear disarmament. There are two badges with a symbol of CND which states ‘Pensioners for peace’. One of the badges highlights ‘Give Peace a Chance’ which again has a symbol of CND. The wooden white dove represents peace, appreciating simple things in life as well as signifying qualities of home, security and maternal characters. Aiding to find inner peace by meditation and by deep breathing. The ‘Green Peace’ badge of a white dove carrying an olive branch specifies the rainforest being demolished. The olive branches are being used for palm oil which is destroying the forest. The green badge, an illustration of a dove with a pound sign which states ‘Peace Tax Campaign’. This badge clearly shows that taxes were being paid for the war. It aims legal rights to conscientious objection to taxes and for it to be spent on peacebuilding rather than spending it in the war. Badges have been a long been used to highlight different campaigns. We have many badges on display in the museum that relate to women’s rights and other important issues. For more information pay a visit to the museum to see our collection. Seerat Mahmood. Seerat is a current student at Bradford College studying BA (Hons) Education Studies. She recently completed a three week work placement at the Museum.    

Peace History is Herstory Too: An Exhibition Celebrating Women’s Peace History.

Peace History is Herstory Too: An Exhibition Celebrating Women’s Peace History.

Exhibitions | 03-03-2015

A new exhibition opening at the Museum! EXTENDED by popular demand!

Peace History is Herstory Too: An Exhibition Celebrating Women's Peace History.

WILPF, Zurich, 1919

WILPF, Zurich, 1919

To celebrate International Women’s Day on March 8th, and the Centenary of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom in April, the Peace Museum is proud to present an exhibition exploring the efforts of women and women’s groups throughout history to campaign for peace and equality.The exhibition was originally meant to run from March through until May but due to popular demand we have extended this to include the rest of the summer months. The exhibition also features an extension of our permanent Greenham Common exhibition: Common Ground, Uncommon Women. It explores the history of the WILPF, the Cooperative Women’s Guild and includes banners and objects from various local, national and international women’s peace groups. The exhibition highlights how women’s groups have been at the forefront of campaigns, such as the extension of women’s rights, campaigns for equality and have been at the forefront of vocal and active opposition against nuclear weaponry. The Museum would welcome group visits to the view the exhibition, particularly those celebrating IWD and the centenary of the WILPF. The Museum is open every Thursday 10am till 4pm, and at other times by prior arrangement. To book a visit, contact shannen.lang@peacemuseum.org.uk. Please download the leaflet; feel free to display/distribute accordingly, Women's Exhibition Leaflet.

Travelling Exhibitions

Travelling Exhibitions

Collection | 19-02-2015

Travelling Exhibitions

The Peace Museum has five travelling exhibitions that are available for loan by an organisation/individual for the purposes of a short-term display. They cover various themes and topics and come in a range of different sizes. We do not charge for this service; however the borrower must cover postage and packaging costs. In addition, as the Museum is a charity, a donation which would cover staff time in arranging the loan would be most welcomed. To discuss the loaning of our travelling exhibitions, please contact The Peace Museum Team by email at info@peacemuseum.org.uk. For further information regarding the travelling exhibitions we have, please download our leaflet: Travelling Exhibitions Leaflet 2015.

Page 1 of 41234