Since the start of the pandemic, across the world lockdown measures have meant most people have had to stay at home, with vulnerable people shielding themselves and households having to self isolate if they show any symptoms of the virus. Many people will have felt that their communities and local neighbourhoods have become more connected as people have had to rely on others to provide essentials.

Every Thursday for ten weeks in the UK, people stood on their doorsteps and clapped for the NHS, carers and key workers, a moment of national togetherness to say thank you for those who put themselves at risk. People and organisations have fundraised for NHS charities by undertaking challenges or creating charity products.

Easter, Passover and Ramadan were celebrated under the unusual circumstances of lockdown.  Everyone found new ways to connect with friends and family, doing ‘pub’ quizzes via Zoom or Skype every weekend and social distancing became the new normal.

This sense of togetherness and community spirit has helped many people feel less isolated and more hopeful for the future.